Friday, September 21, 2012

All Saints, Ashmont, Historic Structure Report to Guide Building’s Restoration


HBI was pleased to play an important role over the last two years in the completion of a comprehensive historic structure report for the Parish of All Saints, Ashmont—an architecturally significant church in Boston’s Dorchester neighborhood.

Drumming "Down Dudley" TOMORROW-September 22, 2012



If you enjoyed Summerfeast, you are going to love Common Thread's next event, tomorrow, Saturday, September 22, 2012 from 3-6

Drumming "Down Dudley"

Join  in for drumming, arts, activities, refreshments, entertainment and more at the Dudley Library Plaza!

To learn more click here.

Friday, September 14, 2012

Grants to Malcolm X House Support Restoration Planning and Projects

Historic Boston Inc. is pleased to announce that it has received three grants for restoration planning and projects at the Malcolm X-Ella Little Collins House in Roxbury.  Two grants, totaling $79,000, are contributions from the 1772 Foundation of Connecticut and a third grant of $8,250 is from the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Johanna Favrot Fund forHistoric Preservation.  The contributions are helping to complete comprehensive planning and undertake initial preservation projects at the severely distressed historic building.

Named by the National Trust for Historic Preservation as one of the nation’s 11 Most Endangered Historic Places in June, the Malcolm X House at 72 Dale Street is the only remaining residential building associated with the youth of Malcolm Little, the young man who became the 20th century human rights leader Malcolm X.  

Before converting to Islam and changing his name to Malcolm X, young Malcolm Little spent about ten years in Boston.  During much of that time, he lived in this house belonging to his sister, Ella and her husband Kenneth Collins.  Ella Collins was a Roxbury businesswoman and civil rights activist, who mentored the young Malcolm, financed his life-changing trip to Mecca, and picked up his civil right mantle when was slain in 1965.

You say Vertullo, I say Bonney-Keith Block, Let’s Fix the Whole Thing Up…Part II

Earlier this week we began a two-part blog post series focusing on the many interesting and unexpected things we discovered about the Vertullo Building in planning for its rehabilitation. Assembling this knowledge—both historic and physical—into a coherent story  not only sheds light on community history and guides a historically sensitive rehab, but can become a powerful tool to build a case for critical tax credit support. This second and final post describes some of the physical evidence that we glimpsed in historic images of the building and that we uncovered on the building itself, which we are using to guide the restoration of the building’s architectural character.

Tuesday, September 11, 2012

You say Vertullo, I say Bonney-Keith Block, Let’s Fix the Whole Thing Up…


On August 31, 2012, Historic Boston submitted an application to the Massachusetts Historical Commission for an allocation of Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credits to help subsidize the comprehensive rehab of the building at 74-84 Fairmount Avenue in Hyde Park. This was the culmination of almost a year’s worth of research and planning, following HBI’s purchase of the building in late September of 2011. Along the way, we uncovered many interesting and unexpected things about the building. More importantly, we learned how assembling this knowledge—both historic and physical—into a coherent story  not only sheds light on community history and guides a historically sensitive rehab, but can become a powerful tool to build a case for critical tax credit support. This is the first in a series of two posts that describes some of what we uncovered, and how this relates to planning for and funding the rehabilitation of this important building.